O R P H A N .


cerebral music, cameras, culinary, nutrition, physical and spiritual health, literature,
architecture and nature, strength and peace, weakness and acceptance & balance, mostly.

kropotkindersurprise:

Two ways of dealing with tear gas grenades from comrades in Turkey: Either submerge them in water. Make sure you can close off the container cause the gas will still spread for a while. Or throw them in the fire so the gas burns off before it can spread.

(via ladystilts)

magicjug:

zebablah:

flawlessxqueen:

This is the young man that was walking with Mike Brown,

horrifying.

THIS IS NOT OKAY

(via elizabeth-antoinette)

theroyaltenenblarghs:

lipstickstainedlove:

descentintotyranny:

Israel begins its ground invasion of the Gaza Strip

Fucking signal boost this shit

This is one of the most horrific things happening in the world and yet I can’t seem to find out any news about it.

Ambulances are being shot by tanks. Doctors, civilians, children playing on the beach and everyone else are all being killed.

(via inmensus)

Professor Haldane:

'If my mental processes are determined wholly by the motions of atoms in my brain, I have no reason to suppose that my beliefs are true… and hence I have no reason for supposing my brain to be composed of atoms.'

Mr. Handsome Pants with me and Tin. Santa Cruz.

Mr. Handsome Pants with me and Tin. Santa Cruz.

(Source: Flickr / charleschew)

years later, and still one of the densest and beautifully executed films I have ever seen.

years later, and still one of the densest and beautifully executed films I have ever seen.

charliechew:

Nature shoot with George pt. 1

(Source: Flickr / charleschew)

gelunnucifera:

callan-the-misandrist:

positive-press-daily:

This lamp absorbs 150 times more CO2 than a tree

It’s still in the “so crazy it just might work” stage, but these microalgae-powered lamps, invented by French biochemist Pierre Calleja, could absorb a ton of carbon from the air every year. That’s as much as 150 to 200 trees. [x]


NEAT

YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND. This is ingenious.
The design is a light bulb surrounded by a glass casing. The glass is filled with (water based) media and microalgae. The top is permeable to gasses so that gas exchange can occur. All of the wiring is linked to the grid underground.
Since the light source is inside, it gets scattered and “dimmed” by the water and algae. This makes it less glaringly bright and scatters the light wider, which is good for a street light. It is not longer white light as well, which helps make it easier on the eyes while still providing light.
At the same time, it provides the light for photosynthesis in the algae, so they are continuously exchanging CO2 for O2, not just in the day. It also provides a source of heat, which helps keep the algae from going dormant during cold weather (as in the snowy picture above).
And notice how I did not specify permeability - that’s because NOx’s (NO and NO2) are also permeable and can be used as nitrogen sources to microalgae. In fact, algae are relatively low maintenance. As autotrophs, they don’t require super complex media, not does it really need to be changed/added to. (I’m actually fairly certain that there would still be algae in these tanks a year later; it may need to be cleaned or something, but there would be some living algae.)

gelunnucifera:

callan-the-misandrist:

positive-press-daily:

This lamp absorbs 150 times more CO2 than a tree

It’s still in the “so crazy it just might work” stage, but these microalgae-powered lamps, invented by French biochemist Pierre Calleja, could absorb a ton of carbon from the air every year. That’s as much as 150 to 200 trees. [x]

NEAT

YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND. This is ingenious.

The design is a light bulb surrounded by a glass casing. The glass is filled with (water based) media and microalgae. The top is permeable to gasses so that gas exchange can occur. All of the wiring is linked to the grid underground.

Since the light source is inside, it gets scattered and “dimmed” by the water and algae. This makes it less glaringly bright and scatters the light wider, which is good for a street light. It is not longer white light as well, which helps make it easier on the eyes while still providing light.

At the same time, it provides the light for photosynthesis in the algae, so they are continuously exchanging CO2 for O2, not just in the day. It also provides a source of heat, which helps keep the algae from going dormant during cold weather (as in the snowy picture above).

And notice how I did not specify permeability - that’s because NOx’s (NO and NO2) are also permeable and can be used as nitrogen sources to microalgae. In fact, algae are relatively low maintenance. As autotrophs, they don’t require super complex media, not does it really need to be changed/added to. (I’m actually fairly certain that there would still be algae in these tanks a year later; it may need to be cleaned or something, but there would be some living algae.)

(Source: exclusively-positive-press, via everythingyoulovetohate)

-uhhleeseeuhh:

thatwellspokentoken:

Powerful pic.
Legendary. Beginning of an era.
Birth of a kingdom.
Birth of a nation. 

oh. my. god.

-uhhleeseeuhh:

thatwellspokentoken:

Powerful pic.

Legendary. Beginning of an era.

Birth of a kingdom.

Birth of a nation. 

oh. my. god.

(Source: life-anuka, via gallifreyanturtles)

krakensdottir:

amyelizabeth:

ladyknucklesinshape:

crackerhell:

goodstuffhappenedtoday:


How A Middle-School Principal Persuaded Students To Come To School


by David Kestenbaum

Shawn Rux took over as principal of MS 53, a New York City middle school, last year. At the time, 50 or 60 kids were absent every day. You could understand why they stayed away: The school was chaos.
Twenty-two teachers had quit, the entire office staff had quit, and hundreds of kids had been suspended. The school was given a grade of F from the city’s department of education.
“It was in a bad place,” Rux says.
Rux decided he needed to create incentives for kids to come to school. Incentives that were more obvious to middle-school kids than, “If you come to school you’ll be better off 20 years from now.”
He handed out raffle tickets to anyone who showed up to school on time. One of the prizes was an Xbox. And he threw in an element of randomness: The first kids in line when the doors opened might get 20 tickets.
It worked. Kids started showing up early.“It was … like, ‘Get out of my way, I’m trying to get into school,’ ” Rux says. “It was nice.”Rux also created his own currency. He called it Rux Bux. Teachers hand them out when kids are well behaved. They can be traded in for school supplies, or special lunches. A sixth-grader named Wander Rodriguez is trying to save up 5,000 Rux Bux — enough for a personal shopping spree with Rux.
The principal also stands outside school every morning, greeting the students as they show up. This recognition is another, subtler incentive to come to school. “I like this school,” Wander Rodriguez says. “They treat me like home, they treat me nice, they always give me stuff. … They always say ‘hi’ in the mornings.”The school went from an F to a C. Daily attendance went up to over 90 percent. Then the hurricane hit.
The school is in Far Rockaway, Queens — one of the areas hardest hit by the storm. Some kids’ homes were destroyed. One student who stayed at home through the storm told a teacher, “My apartment complex was in the middle of the ocean.” Rux’s car was destroyed. The first floor of his house was flooded.After the storm, after school started up again, Rux’s goal was to get attendance back to 90 percent. Every day, his staff texts him the attendance numbers. The day I visited last week, 89.2 percent of students attended school. Close, but not close enough for Rux.
The storm has been tough on everyone, he says. But that’s no excuse. Kids have to be in school.



not going to see this man in no news nowhere

krakensdottir:

amyelizabeth:

ladyknucklesinshape:

crackerhell:

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

How A Middle-School Principal Persuaded Students To Come To School

not going to see this man in no news nowhere

(via spookyblackman)

My goodness…

My goodness…

Irish coffee after work, at work.

(Source: Flickr / charleschew)